Gender and Age Differences in Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning

Danijela Jandrić, Karmen Boras, Zvonimir Šimić

Abstract


Self-regulated learning is an active participation in a learning process, which comprises cognitive, metacognitive and behavioural processes, and involves learning strategies and peer learning. In the basis of self-regulation is motivation, which in school settings can be specified as test anxiety, selfefficacy, and intrinsic and extrinsic value. The aim of this research was to verify the differences between male and female participants as well as between fifth- and seventh-grade students, regarding intrinsic and extrinsic value, self-efficacy, test anxiety, learning strategies and peer learning. Participants were fifth- and seventh-grade students (N = 172) from two elementary schools. No differences were found between male and female participants in intrinsic and extrinsic value, self-efficacy, learning strategies and peer learning. However, statistically significant differences in the all of the above-mentioned variables were found between younger and older students. Weaker motivation and self-regulated learning, found among older students, confirmed previous findings in this field. Results are discussed within the framework of personality development and selfdetermination theory which describe academic motivation and self-regulated learning.

Keywords


motivation; self-regulated learning; age; gender

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